Category Archives: Zachary Lutsky

Basic First Aid Following a Gunshot Wound

A former attending emergency medicine physician at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, Dr. Zachary Lutsky has been practicing medicine for more than 10 years. Over the course of his career, Dr. Zachary Lutsky has managed and treated patients suffered from a variety of traumatic injuries, including gunshot wounds.

Although many people never have to deal with a gunshot wound, knowing a few basic first aid techniques for promoting survival following such an injury is important. As soon as you or someone near you is shot, the first step is to always get to safety and call 911. Once this is done, focus on stopping the bleeding. While gunshot wounds primarily cause internal damage, external bleeding is the only aspect of the injury you can help with if you’re untrained.

With gunshot wounds, the bleeding is typically coming from a hole. Using a clean cloth, gauze, or any other fabric available when a kit is not present, place pressure directly on the wound. For wounds that are deep, pack some of the cloth into the wound. Make sure the entire wound is sealed by the fabric and do not reduce pressure until paramedics arrive on the scene. Further, don’t be scared about using your knee to provide even more pressure if the wound is still bleeding.

In addition to applying pressure directly to the wound, use a tourniquet when the wound is on a limb. Place the tourniquet about two to three inches above the wound and pull it as tight as you can. When properly placed, these devices are usually very uncomfortable and even painful, but they can be essential for stopping the bleeding from a wound. It’s important that you remember to only use a tourniquet when it’s a professional one. Since improvised tourniquets often fail, it’s better if you apply continuous pressure directly to the wound instead.

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When a Burn Is an Emergency

For more than two decades, Dr. Zachary Lutsky has practiced emergency medicine as an attending physician. Dr. Zachary Lutsky has delivered timely care to patients suffering from acute traumatic injuries, including severe burns.

Burns caused by heat, chemicals, or the sun vary in degrees of severity. First-degree burns affect the outermost layer of the skin and can be treated with first aid. However, when first-degree burns cover a large portion of the body, such as an intense sunburn, a trip to urgent care may be helpful.

Second- and third-degree burns are far more serious and always require medical attention. In a second-degree burn, a deeper layer of skin is burned, leaving large, weeping blisters. Second-degree burns are especially dangerous if they cover more than 10 percent of the body or if they appear in sensitive areas, such as the face, groin, and hands.

A third-degree burn of any size, due to the extensive tissue damage, should be treated as an emergency. Third-degree burns can make the skin appear brown or charred and are often painless because of nerve damage.

Understanding Level 1 Trauma Centers

Dr. Zachary Lutsky served as an attending physician in the emergency department at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, for 11 years. Over his tenure at the Level 1 trauma center, Dr. Zachary Lutsky treated patients with a variety of serious injuries.

Though the meaning of the designation “Level 1” can vary from state to state, certain characteristics are common nationwide. Level 1 means that the facility offers trauma patients the highest level of surgical care. A Level 1 trauma center can usually care for patients with any type of injury and can provide the full range of support services, including those related to rehabilitation and trauma prevention.

Sometimes, different parts of a facility will have different designations. A facility may, for instance, be a Level 1 trauma center for pediatrics and a Level 2 center for adults.

Patients can expect a Level 1 trauma facility to deliver care on a 24-hour basis. Moreover, that care may be general or specialized. For example, procedures may be aided by specialists like plastic surgeons, anesthesiologists, cardiologists, radiologists, and other professionals.

Flu Now Persists Year Round in America’s Urban Populations

Dr. Zachary Lutsky is a respected physician in Southern California who has extensive experience in meeting the needs of trauma patients. Among Dr. Zachary Lutsky’s areas of expertise are emergency medicine and he also has a particular interest in flu epidemics.

An article published in Science last year drew attention to the way in which the flu has adapted in recent decades in dense urban areas of the United States. In normal situations, the flu only occurs in cold and dry seasons, as the virus is often spread via coughing or sneezing and cannot survive long in warmer, more humid environments.

Researchers recently found that, with more and more people living in close proximity, natural flu regulation has stopped functioning as it once did. When the virus only needs to journey a few inches to the next person, it never loses the ability to spread, even during hotter months. At the same time, seasonal winter spikes are not as severe or widespread, because more people have encountered and successfully fought off the virus.

What the study points to is a need to reshape health workers’ strategies for controlling the flu in areas where it persists year round.