Category Archives: Health

How Common Are Heart Attacks?

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As attending physician, Dr. Zachary Lutsky cares for people in need of emergent medical attention through several Emergency Departments in Los Angeles. Emergency physicians like Dr. Zachary Lutsky often save patients facing common life or death cardiac events.

A heart attack occurs when the body is no longer able to provide the heart muscle adequate blood to sustain its function. When deprived of blood, muscle cells begin to die, and if too many die, then the heart can no longer pump blood throughout the body, leading to death.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the United States heart attacks occur frequently, about once every 40 seconds. In a 12-month period, there are nearly 800,000 heart attack victims in America. Of those attacks, 580,000 happen in patients who have not had a heart attack before, and about 200,000 happen to people who’ve suffered a heart attack in the past.

Not all heart attacks are deadly. In fact, of the people who have a heart attack each year, only about 14 percent pass away as a result. It’s important if a person exhibits heart attack symptoms that emergency services are called immediately, as prompt medical intervention can save the person’s life.

Heart attacks manifest classic symptoms like pain radiating from the chest into the back, jaw, and neck. During a heart attack, people may also experience shortness of breath and nausea, among other symptoms.

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Commonly Overlooked Symptoms of Heart Attacks

Heart Attacks
Image: webmd.com

A board certified emergency medicine physician, Zachary Lutsky received his MD from RFU/Chicago Medical School more than 15 years ago. Since then he has served as an attending physician at such institutions as Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Santa Clara Valley Medical. Over the course of his career, Dr. Zachary Lutsky has dealt with such conditions as heart attacks.

Most people are familiar with the typical symptoms of a heart attack, such as pain in the arms and chest discomfort. However, not every heart attack victim experiences pain in these areas. In fact, some individuals have pain or aches in other areas of the body, including the neck, stomach, or jaw. This pain often appears after exercise and will disappear as someone rests, thus leading many people to believe the pain is exercise-related.

Beyond pain, individuals struggling with a heart-related problem may experience fatigue that is unrelated to medicines or illnesses. When heart-related, fatigue is often described as a general weakness in the body that is associated with subtle symptoms, including shortness of breath. Since these associated symptoms are often minimal, individuals often overlook them.

Another common symptom of heart attack that gets overlooked, particularly in women, is indigestion. While indigestion and other stomach issues are a common occurrence for some, they may also precede a heart attack. For this reason, individuals should always contact their doctor whenever they have any unexplained indigestion.

Understanding Level 1 Trauma Centers

Dr. Zachary Lutsky served as an attending physician in the emergency department at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, for 11 years. Over his tenure at the Level 1 trauma center, Dr. Zachary Lutsky treated patients with a variety of serious injuries.

Though the meaning of the designation “Level 1” can vary from state to state, certain characteristics are common nationwide. Level 1 means that the facility offers trauma patients the highest level of surgical care. A Level 1 trauma center can usually care for patients with any type of injury and can provide the full range of support services, including those related to rehabilitation and trauma prevention.

Sometimes, different parts of a facility will have different designations. A facility may, for instance, be a Level 1 trauma center for pediatrics and a Level 2 center for adults.

Patients can expect a Level 1 trauma facility to deliver care on a 24-hour basis. Moreover, that care may be general or specialized. For example, procedures may be aided by specialists like plastic surgeons, anesthesiologists, cardiologists, radiologists, and other professionals.

Flu Now Persists Year Round in America’s Urban Populations

Dr. Zachary Lutsky is a respected physician in Southern California who has extensive experience in meeting the needs of trauma patients. Among Dr. Zachary Lutsky’s areas of expertise are emergency medicine and he also has a particular interest in flu epidemics.

An article published in Science last year drew attention to the way in which the flu has adapted in recent decades in dense urban areas of the United States. In normal situations, the flu only occurs in cold and dry seasons, as the virus is often spread via coughing or sneezing and cannot survive long in warmer, more humid environments.

Researchers recently found that, with more and more people living in close proximity, natural flu regulation has stopped functioning as it once did. When the virus only needs to journey a few inches to the next person, it never loses the ability to spread, even during hotter months. At the same time, seasonal winter spikes are not as severe or widespread, because more people have encountered and successfully fought off the virus.

What the study points to is a need to reshape health workers’ strategies for controlling the flu in areas where it persists year round.